Is Blue Logo Right for Your Brand?

Is Blue Logo Right for Your Brand?

14min read  

27 Aug 2020

Facebook, Twitter, Visa, Samsung, Ford: What’s the deal with so many influential corporations choosing blue as their logo color? What does the color blue mean in logo design, and is it a coincidence that so many companies go for blue, making it the most popular brand color? Let’s discover together. 

It’s no secret that most people remember a brand by none other than its signature color. Think about it: some companies have complicated names that are a headache to remember. And logo designs can easily slip our minds if we don’t see them often. In this scenario, which is not uncommon, a company’s best bet to be remembered is to use the right logo color. 

Whether present in logos, websites, products, or online content, color has a strong influence on how a brand is perceived. Having already covered pink logos, our logo color series will explore blue logos this time. 

If you’re interested in unveiling the psychology of the world’s favorite color, why certain industries tend to choose it, and whether you should also, keep reading! 

  • The Psychology of Blue 
  • Which Industries Tend to Choose Blue?
  • Is Blue Logo Right for Your Brand?
  • Blue Logo Color Combinations 
  • How to Design a Blue Logo?

 

The Psychology of Blue 

Closely linked to human emotions, colors carry subliminal messages and provoke specific responses in people. To discover what emotional impact blue has on our psyche, let’s play a game. 

What are the first associations when you see or hear about the color blue? Perhaps, your mind can already picture a serene sky, an untroubled ocean, the silhouette of an extensive mountain range, and so on. 

Now let’s look back at the images our minds painted and ask ourselves how they make us feel. More often than not, the described scenes invoke feelings of calm, peacefulness, and safety. That’s precisely how our brains perceive the color blue. 

Blue is known to bring a calming effect, produce harmony and a sense of security. The popular color signals the following feelings and associations:

the symbolism of blue

It’d make perfect sense that businesses trying to target the above-mentioned associations would go for blue as their brand color. And brand color extends beyond just the logo design. It’s used consistently throughout the company’s social media channels, website color scheme, products, packaging, etc.

 

Which Industries Tend to Choose Blue?

We already mentioned that blue is the most commonly used hue in logo designs. But when you throw a closer look, you notice that specific industries and markets stand out, as the color heavily dominates them. Let’s discover what those industries are and why they choose to resort to blue of all colors.

 

Finance and Banking 

Did you know that over 75% of credit card brands use blue in their logos? This is hardly surprising since banks and financial institutions in general deal with their customers’ money. And no financial transaction would be possible without one critical factor — trust. 

Every financial business strives to establish itself as a company that can be trusted and relied on. Being the symbol of responsibility, honesty, and dependability, blue gets the job done quite efficiently. The impact of blue logos on clients might be slight and subliminal, but research shows that banks are persistent in their use of blue, and it’s not likely to change anytime soon.Finance and banking blue logo examples

Examples of blue logos in the finance and banking industry are endless. A few of the most prominent names are American Express, JPMorgan Chase Bank, Capital One, Bank of America, Visa, PayPal, Venmo, and so forth.

 

Auto and Tech

Blue has made quite a name for itself in the tech and auto industries as well. Whether a company produces motor vehicles or tech gadgets, it usually relies on the quality and long lifespan of its products as one of the main selling points. 

Blue has long been interlinked with endurance, consistency, and high quality. By choosing the cold color for their logo, auto and tech companies make a nonverbal promise that they stand by the quality and durability of their products.

Another interesting thread that runs through brands with blue logos is that they have been around for quite some time. Take Ford or General Motors, for example — these companies have been operating since the beginning of the 20th century. The household names couldn’t have chosen a better color for their logos, as blue is one of the most widely used symbols of consistency and longevity.auto and tech blue logo examples

Logos of the cooler hue are also often spotted among airlines. Some major companies known for their blue logos are British Airways, United Airlines, Air France, and others. Their choice of color is reasonable, considering that blue is a calming color that replaces panic with a sense of safety.

 

Social Media and Telecommunications

Look at your phone applications: how many blue icons can you spot? It’s interesting how so many of the leading social media platforms are marked with a blue logo. The trend is not surprising, though. Blue represents communication, clarity, as well as security of data. 

Companies like Facebook, Skype, and Twitter deal with a colossal amount of data, some of which can be very personal. Blue indicates it’s safe for users to trust the social networks with their information — personal or otherwise. And for a platform like LinkedIn, blue signifies professionalism and corporate spirit.social media and telecommunications blue logos

 

Healthcare 

The healthcare industry has also popularized blue logos. Health institutions, insurance providers, and other medical businesses have their own reasons for choosing blue. As a color known to calm the nerves, blue stands for mental and physical well-being, tranquillity, emotional stability, clarity of thoughts, and more. 

Dental clinics have developed a preference for the soothing color due to the fact that most people are absolutely terrified of dentists. Blue is meant to calm the frightened clients down. 

If you’re looking for examples of healthcare businesses with blue logos, you don’t have to look far. The World Health Organization itself has a blue icon. Other examples include Blue Cross Blue Shield, UnitedHealth Group, Metlife, Orab-B, Crest, and many more.Healthcare blue logo examples

 

Is Blue Logo Right for Your Brand?

There is no definitive answer to whether a blue logo suits your business, as you have to factor in your target audience, market, company values, and brand identity. Regardless of the industry your business operates in, blue would be a smart pick for you only if it aligns with your brand values and your relationship with customers.

You might have noticed that not a lot of entertainment companies go for blue. This is not a coincidence: blue is a cooling, relaxing color that doesn’t necessarily urge people to take immediate action. Vibrant colors such as red, orange, and pink are much more effective in encouraging purchases. 

 Blue is an excellent option for businesses that rely on consistency and timelessness rather than popularity and trends. The royal color implies authority, logic, professionalism: if these words resonate with your company values and philosophy, a blue logo might be exactly what you need.

 

Blue Logo Color Combinations 

As a passive, yielding color, blue is often used in color combinations to deepen and ground down the design. Let’s explore how brands have added a twist to their logos, partnering shades of blue with a different color.

 

White and Blue 

White and blue make up one of the most common color combinations, even though neither of the colors is particularly assertive nor energetic. Logos using this color match look rather harmonious and put-together. The legendary icons of Facebook, Twitter, Skype, and Ford are perfect examples of this.Skype logo colors with hex codes

 

Pink and Blue 

Despite their differences, pink and blue make a great team when used in various graphics. The contrast between the cold and warm hues brings energy and liveliness to the logo design. Flickr and Baskin-Robbins have put this color combination to great use with their bicolor logos.Baskin-Robbins logo colors with hex codes

 

Red and Blue 

The powerful combination of red and blue has been utilized not only by brand logos but also by country flags. Blue provides a solid background to its bolder counterpart, allowing the latter to shine in all its glory. Red and blue logos can be found in every industry: Pepsi, Danone, Bank of America, and British Airways are real proof of this.Pepsi logo colors with hex codes

 

How to Design a Blue Logo?

Ready to create a blue logo for your brand? We’ve got just the right tool for you. Renderforest blue logo maker will allow you to design a logo in a couple of minutes without leaving your browser. 

Type in your brand name and a few words about your logo requirements, and our responsive logo generator will get back to you with several designs. Another option is to select your business industry from the category section of our logo maker and you’ll find dozens of ready-made templates to tailor to your brand. 

Pick any template that catches your eye and customize it with your text, font, colors, and style. Afterward, you can download the finished product in your preferred logo file format.

Renderforest blue logo maker

Need some inspiration for your logo? Here are a few designs made with our logo maker.

blue logos created with Renderforest

 

Summing Up

Blue is the most preferred color not only by people but also by companies. In brand logos, blue represents trust, honesty, dependability, quality, and security. Blue logos can be found in a wide range of industries, including finance and banking, auto, tech, telecommunications, health, and others.  

If you have decided on blue as your logo color, click the button below to start creating your custom logo today!

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